La Llegada de los Redemtoristas

The acquisition of St. Joseph’s by the Redemptorist Fathers presented them a number of problems. The Redemptorists, as a religious order, had been founded to work with the poor and the most abandonded among God’s people. At the time of Bishop Matz’s request, St. Joseph’s parish did not meet the criteria. The Redemtorists were a missionary congregation and were not looking for a foundation which included parochial responsibilities. Redemtorists also placed a high Premium in a living religious community and being in contact with other Redemtorist. Denver was still very frontier. The nearest Redemtorist community was five hundred miles away. At a time when traveling was difficult and slow, this  posed a considerable obstacle to Redemtorist vocation and love of the community. Fr. Malone also faced a problem, even after he had been suspended and removed as pastor, he continued to return to the parish where he had served and did at times interfere with Fr. Sullivan’s administrative, financial, and contractual problems that had yet to be clarified. Bishop Matz petitioned about the Redemtorist Fathers on three separate occasions before any problems were adequately resolved.

      The Redemtorists took possession of the parish on November 9, 1894. On that day, the Redemtorist ordered all of the debts of the parish and the parish became legally known as St. Joseph’s Redemtorist Parish. During this time the parish boundaries were as follows: on the North, the line drawn through Eleventh Avenue to Fifteenth Street (Acoma); on the South, a line drawn through First Avenue, Evans (Cherokee), and Bayaud Streets; on the East, aline drawn through Acoma Street, Cherry Creek and First Avenue; and on the West, the Platte River.
      The first Redemptorist pastor was appointed on November 19, 1894. His name was Fr. Daniel Mullane, C.Ss.R., and he remained as pastor for about a year. He resigned in February of 1895 because of his poor health and was succeeded as pastor by Fr. William Bond, C.Ss.R. Fr. Bond had been acting pastor for two months prior to his official appointment and had acquired three lots of property behind the Church's building. On this property stood a brick cottage converted into a house for the Redemptorist community and a rectory. The Redemtorists moved into their new rectory in April of 1895.